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天下莫柔弱於水,而功堅強者莫之能勝。

弱之勝強,柔之勝剛。

Nothing in the world is as soft, flexible and yielding as water, yet it can dissolve the hardest things. The soft and supple overcome the hard, the gentle overcomes the rigid and strong.

-Dao Te Jing



TAIJI QUAN JING
Attributed to Zhang San Feng (est. 1279 -1386)

In motion the whole body should be light and agile,
with all parts of the body connected
as if threaded together.
The qi (vital energy) should be excited,
The shen (spirit) should be gathered within.
The posture should be correct, without hollow or projection, without stop or disconnection.
The jin (internal strength) is rooted in the feet,
generated from the legs, directed by the waist, and
manifested through the fingers.
From the feet, to the legs, and then the waist,
body moves as an integrated whole.
Only then, in moving forward and backward, can the good timing and position gained.
Where the good timing and position have not been gained, the body is scattered, the correction for this error must be sought in the waist and legs.
The principle applies for moving in all directions;
upward or downward, forward or backward, left or right.
All movements are directed by yi (intention), not by form.
If there is up, there must be down; if there is forward, there must be backward; when strike left, pay attention to the right.
If one intends to move upward, one must direct intent downward.
If one intends to uproot an object, then one must apply leverage to uplift it. Thus the root will be severed, and it will be collapsed quickly and certainly.
Insubstantial and substantial should be clearly differentiated.
Each movement has insubstantiality and substantiality;
all movements have both insubstantiality and substantiality.
The entire body is threaded together joint by joint without the slightest break. (Part One)

Chang Quan (Long Boxing) is like long Yangzi River and big ocean rolling on unceasingly.
Peng (Ward Off), Lu ( Pull Back), Ji (Press), An (Push), Cai (Pluck), Lie (Split), Zhou (Elbow), and Kao (Shoulder ) are equated to the Eight Trigrams.
Jin (Advance),Tui (Withdraw) , Ku (Gaze Left), Pan (Look Right) and Zhong Ding (Central Equilibrium) are equated to the five elements.
Peng, Lu, Ji, An are the cardinal directions; Kan, Li, Zhen, Dui.
Cai, Lie, Zhou, Kao are the four corners: Qian, Kun,Sun,Gen.
Jin, Tui, Gu, Pan, and Zhong Ding are equated to the five elements:
metal, wood, water, fire, and earth
All together these are named the Thirteen Postures. (Part Two)
-Translated by Janet Jin

A footnote appended to this Classic by Yang Lu Chan(1799-1872) reads: This treatise was left by the Daoist sage Zhang San Feng of Wu Tang Mountain, with a desire toward helping people achieve longevity, and not merely as a means to martial skill.

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THE TREATISE ON TAIJI QUAN
Attributed to Wang Zong Yue (18th Century)

Taiji is born from wuji; it is the mother of yin and yang.
In motion, it divides; in stillness, it unites.
Not excessive or insufficient; follow, bend, and then extend.
When the opponent is hard, I am soft, it is called yielding.
When I follow the opponent while he resists, it is called sticking.
If the opponent moves quickly, then I respond quickly;
if he moves slowly, then I follow slowly.
Although the transformations have innumerable variations,
the principles remain the same.
Through practice and experience, one gradually comprehends jin (internal strength);
from the comprehension of jin, one can reach awakening clarity.
Without diligent practice, one cannot understand Taiji.
Empty, calm, lively, relax and let jin reach the top of the head,
let qi (vital energy) sink to the diantian (field of elixir).
Not incline or lean in any direction; suddenly appear, suddenly hidden.
If the opponent comes from right side heavily, then I focus on relaxing left side calmly.
When one raises up, raise the intent higher; when one sinks down, it looks lower; advancing, it moves further; retreating, it seems closer.
A feather cannot be added and a fly cannot land on any part of the body.
The opponent does not know me; I alone know him.
To become a great hero results from this.
There are many martial arts. Although their forms are different, overall they don't go beyond the strong dominating the weak, and the slow yielding to the swift. The strong defeats the weak, the slow hands yield to the swift hands. These are all the results of natural abilities and not of trained techniques from earnest study.
"Four ounces deflects a thousand pounds", clearly we know that technique is more important than the force. When we see an old person defeating a group of people, how can he do it so quickly? -- Stand like a balanced scale and move like a turning wheel. Sinking to one side one can follow easily;
being double-weighted then one becomes sluggish.
Those who have spent years of practice and still cannot neutralize, and are always controlled by their opponent, have not yet apprehended the fault of double-weightedness.
To avoid this fault one must distinguish yin from yang.
To stick is to yield. To yield is to stick.
Within yin there is yang. Within yang there is yin.
Yin and yang aid, change and complete each other.
Understanding this one can say one understands jin.
After one understands jin, the more practice, the more skill.
Quietly treasure knowledge and turn it over in the mind.
Gradually one can move as one wishes.
Fundamentally, it is giving up oneself to follow others.
Many making the mistake of giving up the near and seeking the far, or it is called "To be off in one's aim by the slightest fraction when one starts, one will lose the target by a thousand miles in the end."
The practitioners must remember to follow the principals and do it in detail.
(Translated by Janet Jin)

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SONG OF THE THIRTEEN POSTURES

The Thirteen Postures should not be taken lightly;
the source of the intent and energy is in the waist.
Be mindful of the exchange between insubstantial and substantial;
let qi(energy) circulate throughout the body without the slightest obstruction.
In stillness there is movement, in movement there is stillness;
follow with the opponent's movement and show him the wonders.
Study each posture carefully and practice mindfully;
when one achieves the goal, one will feel it is effortless.
Pay attention to the waist at all times;
completely relax the abdomen and let the qi rise and fill.
Keep the tailbone centered and straight,
let the shen (spirit) reach through to the top of the head;
make the whole body light and agile, feel as if suspended from the top of the head.
Carefully analyze and study ;
bending, extending , opening and closing, be spontaneous.
To enter the door and be shown the way, one must be orally taught;
practice without interruption, technique will be achieved.
Speaking of the form and its application, what is the standard?
The yi (intent) and qi are king, and the bones and muscles are the court.
Think carefully what the final purpose is:
to benefit one's health, to lengthen one's life, and maintain one's youth.
Sing this song of 140 characters;
each character is true and accurate, without omission.
If one does not study this carefully,
then one will waste one's time and sigh with regret.
(Translated by Janet Jin)

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SONG OF PUSH HANDS

Be conscientious in Peng (Wardoff), Lu (Pull), Ji(Press), and An(Push).
Upper and lower body coordinate,
and the opponent finds it difficult to get in.
Let the opponent attack with great force;
use four ounces of skillful jin (internal strength) to deflect a thousand pounds of li (external force).
Lead the opponent into emptiness and lose balance, issue jin immediately.
Zhan (adhere), Lien (connect), Nian (stick), Sui (follow),
do not disconnect or use force against the opponent.
(Translated by Janet Jin)

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YANG'S TEN IMPORTANT POINTS
by Yang Cheng-fu (1883 - 1936)

1. The head should be upright so that the spirit can reach the top of the head.
Do not use strength, or the neck will be stiff, and the breath and blood can not flow through. It is necessary to have a natural and lively feeling. If the natural and lively feeling can not reach the top of head, the spirit can not rise.

2. Sink the chest and pluck up the back.
The chest is depressed naturally inward so that the breath can sink to the Dantian. Do not project the chest. The qi gets stuck there and the body becomes top heavy. The heel will be too light and can be uprooted. Pluck up the back and the qi sticks to the back. Depress the chest and you can pluck up the back. Then you can issue jin through the spine. You will be a peerless boxer.

3. Relax the waist.
The waist is the commander of the whole body. If you can relax the waist, then the two legs will have power and the lower part will be firm and stable. Substantial and insubstantial change, this is based on the turning of the waist. It is said that the source of the postures lies in the waist. If you can not get power, seek the defect in the legs and waist.

4. Differentiate insubstantial and substantial.
This is the first thing of all in Taiji Quan. If the weight of the whole body is resting on the right leg, then the right leg is substantial and the left leg is insubstantial, and vice versa. When you can separate substantial and insubstantial, you can turn lightly without using strength. If you can not separate them, the step is heavy and slow. The stance is not firm and can be easily thrown off balance.

5. Relax the shoulders and drop the elbows.
The shoulders will be completely relaxed and open. If you can not relax and sink, the two shoulders will be tight, the qi will not flow and the whole body can not produce jin. "Drop the elbows" means the elbows sink down and relax. If the elbows rise, the shoulders are not able to sink and you can not discharge people far. The discharge is close to the brute force of the external martial art.

6. Use the mind/intent and not force.
The Taiji Quan classics say, "all of this means use of mind/intent and not of force." In practicing Taiji Quan the whole body relaxes. Do not let any force remain in the blood vessels, bones, and ligaments to tie yourself up. Then you can be agile and able to change. You will be able to turn freely and easily. Doubting this, how can you advance yourself? The body has meridians like the ground has ditches and trenches. If not obstructed, the water can flow. If meridian is not closed, the qi goes through. If the whole body has brute force and it fills up the meridians, the qi and blood stop and the turning is not smooth and agile. Just try to pull one string of hair to make the whole body lose balance. If you use mind, not force, then the mind goes to a place and the qi follows it. The qi and the blood circulate. If you do this every day and never stop, after a long time you will develop internal jin. The Taiji Quan classics say that when you are extremely soft, then you become extremely skilled in Taiji Quan with arms like iron wrapped with cotton and the weight is very heavy. As for those who practice the external martial arts, when they use force, they reveal force. When they do not use force, they are too light and floating. Their force is external and locked together. The force of the external martial arts is easily led and moved.

7. Upper and lower body follow each other.
The Taiji Quan classics say that the motion should be rooted in the feet, released through the legs, controlled by the waist and manifested through the fingers. Every posture applies to the same principal. When the hands, waist and feet move together, the eyes follow. If one part does not coordinate, the whole body is off balance.

8. Internal and external coordinate.
In the practice of Taiji Quan the main thing is the spirit. Therefore, it is said that the spirit is the commander and the body is subordinate. If you can lift the spirit, then the movements will be naturally agile. The postures are not beyond insubstantial and substantial, opening and closing. Open means not only the hands and feet are open, but the mind is also open. Close means not only hands and feet are closed, but the mind is focused within. When you can make external form and internal energy work together, then the jin becomes complete.

9.The Jin is not broken.
As to the external martial arts, their force is the post-heaven brute force. Therefore, it is limited. There are connects and disconnects. During the disconnection the previous force is exhausted and the new force has not yet been born. At these moments, it is very easy for others to take advantage. The Taiji Quan uses mind/intent and not force. From beginning to end it is continuous and not broken. It is circular and again resumes. It revolves and has not limits. The original classic says it is like a long river rolling on unceasing, and the circulation of internal jin is like pulling the silk thread. They all mean connect the jin together.

10. Seek stillness in movement.
The external martial arts assume jumping about is good and they use all their energy. That is why after practice everyone gets tired. Taiji Quan uses stillness to control movement. Although one moves, there is also stillness. Therefore, in practicing the form, slower is better. If it is slow, the inhalation and exhalation are long and deep and the qi sinks to dantain, naturally there is no injury such as engorgement of the blood vessels. The practitioner should be carefully study and comprehend it. Then one will get the true and accurate meaning of Taiji Quan.

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太極拳經 太極拳釋名王宗岳

一舉動,週身俱要輕靈,尤須貫串。

氣宜鼓蕩,神宜內斂。

無使有缺陷處,無使有凸凹處,無使有斷續處。

其根在腳,發於腿,主宰於腰,形於手指。

由腳而腿而腰,總須完整一氣。向前退後,乃能得機得勢。

有不得機得勢處,身便散亂。其病必於腰腿求之。

上下前後左右皆然。

凡此皆是意,不在外面。

有上即有下,有前即有後,有左即有右。

如意要向上,即寓下意。若將物掀起,而加以挫之意。

斯其根自斷,乃壞之速而無疑。

虛實宜分清楚,一處有一處虛實。

處處總此一虛實,周身節節貫串,無令絲毫間斷耳。

 

太極拳,一名長拳,又名十三勢。長拳者,如長江大海,滔滔不絕也。十三勢者,分掤,捋,擠,按,採,挒 ,肘,靠,進,退,顧,盼,定也。

掤,捋,擠,按,即坎,離,震,兌,四正方也。採,挒 ,肘,靠,即乾,坤,艮,巽,四斜角也。此八卦也。進步,退步,左顧,右盼,中定,即金,木,水,火,土也。此五行也。合而言之曰十三勢

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太極拳論王宗岳

 

太極者,無極而生,陰陽之母也。動之則分,靜之則合。無過不及,隨曲就伸。人剛我柔謂之走,我順人背謂之黏。動急則急應,動緩則緩隨。雖變化萬端,而理唯一貫。由著熟而漸悟懂勁,由懂勁而接及神明,然非用力之久,不能豁然貫通焉。

虛領頂勁,氣沉丹田。不偏不倚,忽隱忽現。左重則左虛,右重則右杳。仰之則彌高,俯之則彌深。進之則愈長,退之則愈促。一羽不能加,蠅蟲不能落。人不知我,我獨知人。英雄所向無敵,蓋皆由此而及也。

斯技旁門甚多,雖勢有區別,概不外壯欺弱,慢讓快耳。有力打無力,手慢讓手快,是皆先天自然之能,非關學力而有為也。察「四兩撥千斤」之句,顯非力勝,觀耄耋能禦眾之形,快何能為。

立如枰準,活似車輪。偏沉則隨,雙重則滯。每見數年純功,不能運化者,率皆自為人制,雙重之病未悟耳。欲避此病,須知陰陽。黏即是走,走即是黏。陰不離陽,陽不離陰,陰陽相濟,方為懂勁。懂勁後愈練愈精,默識揣摩,漸至從心所欲。

本是捨己從人,多誤捨近求遠,所謂「差之毫釐,謬之千里」,學者不可不詳辨焉,是為論。

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十三勢歌

十三總勢莫輕視,命意源頭在腰隙。 
變轉虛實須留意,氣遍身軀不稍痴。 
靜中觸動動猶靜,因敵變化是神奇。 
勢勢存心揆用意,得來不覺費工夫。 
刻刻留心在腰間,腹內鬆淨氣騰然。 
尾閭中正神貫頂,滿身輕利頂頭懸。 
仔細留心向推求,屈伸開合聽自由。 
入門引路須口授,工用無息法自休。 
若言體用何為準,意氣君來骨肉臣。 
詳推用意終何在,益壽延年不老春。 
歌兮歌兮百四十,字字真切義無遺。 
若不向此推求去,枉費功夫遺嘆息。

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打手歌

掤捋擠按須認直,上下相隨人難進。


任他巨力來打我,撁動四兩撥千斤。

引進落空合即出,沾連黏隨不丟頂。

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太極拳說十要

楊澄甫口述 陳微明錄

 

一、虛靈頂勁 頂勁者,頭容正直,神貫于頂也。不可用力,用力則項強,氣血不能流通,須有虛靈自然之意。非有虛靈頂勁,則精神不能提起也。

二、含胸拔背 含胸者,胸略內涵,使氣沉于丹田也。胸忌挺出,挺出則氣涌胸際,上重下輕,腳跟易于浮起。拔背者,氣貼于背也。能含胸則自能拔背,能拔背則能力由脊發,所向無敵也。

三、 腰為一身之主宰,能松腰然後兩足有力,下盤穩固。虛實變化皆由腰轉動,故曰︰“命意源頭在腰隙”,有不得力必于腰腿求之也。

四、分虛實 太極拳術以分虛實為第一義。如全身皆坐在右腿,則右腿為實,左腿為虛;全身坐在左腿,則左腿為實,右腿為虛。虛實能分,而後轉動輕靈,毫不費力。如不能分,則邁步重滯,自立不穩,而易為人所牽動。

五、沉肩墜肘 沉肩者,肩松開下垂也。若不能松垂,兩肩端起,則氣亦隨之而上,全身皆不得力矣。墜肘者,肘往下松墜之意。肘若懸起,則肩不能沉,放人不遠,近于外家之斷勁矣。

六、用意不用力 太極拳論雲︰此全是用意不用力。練太極拳,全身松開,不使有分毫之拙勁,以留滯于筋骨血脈之間,以自縛束。然後能輕靈變化,圓轉自如。或疑不用力何以能長力?蓋人身之有經絡,如地之有溝洫。溝洫不塞而水行,經絡不閉則氣通。如渾身僵勁充滿經絡,氣血停滯,轉動不靈,牽一發而全身動矣。若不用力而用意,意之所至,氣即至焉。如是氣血流注,日日貫輸,周流全身,無時停滯。久久練習,則得真正內勁。即太極拳論所雲︰"極柔軟,然後極堅剛"也。太極拳功夫純熟之人,臂膊如綿裹鐵,分量極沉。練外家拳者,用力則顯有力,不用力時,則甚輕浮。可見其力,乃外勁浮面之勁也。不用意而用力,最易引動,不足尚也。

七、上下相隨 上下相隨者,即太極拳論所雲︰“其根在腳,發于腿,主宰于腰,形于手指,由腳而腿而腰,總須完整一氣”也。手動,腰動,足動,眼神亦隨之動。如是方可謂之上下相隨。有一不動,即散亂也。

八、內外相合 太極拳所練在神。故雲︰“神為主帥,身為驅使。”精神能提得起,自然舉動輕靈。架子不外虛實開合。所謂開者,不但手足開,心意與之俱開;所謂合者,不但手足合,心意亦與之俱合。能內外合為一氣,則渾然無間矣。

九、相連不斷 外家拳術,其勁乃後天之拙勁。故有起有止,有續有斷,舊力已盡,新力未生,此時最易為人所乘。太極拳用意不用力,自始至終,綿綿不斷,周而復始,循環無窮。原論所謂“如長江大海,滔滔不絕”,又曰︰“運勁如抽絲”,皆言其貫串一氣也。

十、動中求靜 外家拳術,以跳擲為能,用盡氣力,故練習之後,無不喘氣者。太極拳以靜御動,雖動猶靜,故練架子愈慢愈好。慢則呼吸深長,氣沉丹田,自無血脈僨張之弊。學者細心體會,庶可得其意焉。

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Taichi Posture Names



董式太極拳套名目
Dong Style Taiji Long Form Posture Names

第一段
First section

 

1. 無極式    The State of Wuji Posture

2. 太極起    Taiji Commencement Posture

3. 雀展尾    The Peacock Spreads Its Tail

4. 掤擠按   Ward off, Stroke, Press and Push

5. 單鞭   Single Whip

6. 托手   Hold with Hands

7. 白鶴亮翅   The White Crane Spreads Its Wings

8. 左摟膝打掌   Pull to Knee with Left Hand and Strike

9. 琵琶手   Holding the Lute

10. 左右摟膝打掌    Pull to Knee and StrikeBoth Sides

11. 琵琶手   Holding the Lute

12. 左摟膝打掌    Pull to Knee with Left Hand and Strike

13. 上步扳攬捶   Block, Pull In, and Punch

14. 如封似閉    Apparently Closing 

15. 雙按   Double Downward Push

16. 十字手   Crossed Hands



第二段

Second Section

17. 虎豹回閃   Leopard and Tiger Dodge Backward

18. 掤擠按    Ward off, Stroke, Press and Push

19. 左閃右避   Dodge Sideways

20. 肘底捶    Punch under Elbow

21. 左右倒捏喉   Step Back and Choke Throat, Both Sides

22. 斜飛式    Slant Flying

23. 托手   Hold with Hands

24. 白鶴亮翅   The White Crane Spreads Its Wings

25. 左摟膝打掌   Pull to Knee and Strike

26. 海底針   Needle at Bottom of the Sea

27. 閃托臂   Dodge and Block Up

28. 避身捶   Dodge and Hit with the Fist

29. 單風貫耳   Wind-swept Strike to Ear

30. 上步扳攬捶   Block, Pull In, and Punch

31. 雀展尾    The Peacock Spreads Its Tail

32. 掤擠按    Ward off, Stroke, Press and Push

33. 單鞭   Single Whip

34. 手   Revolving Hands

35. 單鞭    Single Whip

36. 迎面掌   Face Strike    

37. 左右踢腳   Toe Kick Right and Left

38. 轉身左蹬腳   Turn Around Left Heel Kick

39. 左右摟膝打掌  Pull to Knee and StrikeBoth Sides

40. 上步栽捶   Block and Punch Down

41. 避身捶   Dodge and Hit with the Fist

42. 單風貫耳  Wind-swept Strike to the Ear

43. 上步扳攬捶   Block, Pull In, and Punch

44. 斜身右蹬腳  Angle Body and Right Heel Kick

45. 左右打虎式   Hit the Tiger Left and Right

46. 回身右蹬腳   Shift Back and Right Heel Kick

47. 雙風貫耳   Strike with Both Fists

48. 左蹬腳   Left Heel Kick

49. 轉身右蹬腳   Turn Around and Right Heel Kick

50. 上步扳攬捶   Block, Pull In, and Punch  

51. 如封似閉   Apparently Closing

52. 雙按   Double Downward Push

53. 十字手   Crossed Hands

 

第三段

Third Section

 

54. 虎豹回閃    Leopard and Tiger Dodge Backward

55. 掤擠按    Ward off, Stroke, Press and Push

56. 斜單鞭   Oblique Single Whip

57. 左右野馬分鬃   The Wild Horse's Mane Is Parting

58. 雀展尾    The Peacock Spreads Its Tail

59. 掤擠按   Ward off, Stroke, Press and Push

60. 單鞭   Single Whip

61. 玉女穿梭   The Maiden Shuttles

62. 雀展尾    The Peacock Spreads Its Tail

63. 掤擠按   Ward off, Stroke, Press and Push

64. 單鞭    Single Whip

65. 運手   Revolving Hands

66. 單鞭    Single Whip

67. 蛇身下勢   Snake Creeps Down

68. 金雞獨立   The Golden Rooster Is Standing on One Leg

69. 左右倒捏喉   Step Back and Choke Throat

70. 斜飛式   Slant Flying

71. 托手   Hold with Hands

72. 白鶴亮翅   The White Crane Spreads Its Wings

73. 左摟膝 打掌   Pull to Knee and Strike

74. 海底針   Needle at Bottom of the Sea

75. 閃托臂   Dodge and Block Up

76. 身捶   Dodge and Hit with the Fist

77. 白蛇吐信   The White Snake Spits Out Its Tongue

78. 上步扳攬捶   Block, Pull In, and Punch  

79. 雀展尾    The Peacock Spreads Its Tail

80. 掤擠按   Ward off, Stroke, Press and Push

81. 單鞭    Single Whip

82. 運手   Revolving Hands

83. 單鞭    Single Whip

84. 迎面掌代穿喉   Face Strike, Pierce the Throat

85. 十字擺蓮   Cross Leg, Swing Kick

86. 上步指擋捶   Punch the Groin

87. 雀展尾    The Peacock Spreads Its Tail

88. 挫步擠按   Ward off, Stroke, Press and Push

89. 單鞭    Single Whip

90. 蛇身下勢   Snake Creeps Down

91. 上步七星捶   Seven Stars Punch

92. 退步跨虎   The Tiger Springs Back

93. 轉身擺蓮   Turn, Swing Kick

94. 射虎式   Shoot the Tiger

95. 轉身扳攬捶   Turn, Rotation Block, Pull In, and Punch

96. 如封似閉   Apparently Closing

97. 雙按   Double Downward Push

98. 十字手   Crossed Hands

99. 合太極   Conclusion of Taiji

 

Note: The posture names are by Master Dong Zeng Chen, and differ from other popular Taiji posture names in their focus on the application and expression of the form.  The translation is by the Dong School study group.

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董式太極氣功名目

Dong Taiji Qigong Posture Names

 

1.  上下甩手   Swing Arms Up and Down

2.  甩手扭腰   Turn Waist & Swing Arms

3.  拍打肩背   Tap Shoulder

4.  轉頭醒腦   Rotate Neck & Clear Mind

5.  鬆動肩背   Rotate & Relax Shoulder

6.  扭胯轉腰   Rotate Hip & Waist

7.  內外轉膝   Rotate Knees Inward & Outward

8.  起式調息   Move Upward & Modulate Breathing

9.  陰陽交替   Exchange Yin & Yang

10.  行氣歸丹  Move Qi back to Dan Dian

11.  任督通順   Open the Channel of Ren & Du Meridian
12.  扭轉 乾坤  Turn Qian Qun Upside Down
13.  開擴胸懷   Expand the Chest

14.  左顧右盼  Look Left & Gaze Right

15.  左右掤手  Ward Off Left & Right

16.  雙手平按   Push Down with Both Hands

17.  仙鶴展翅   Fairy Crane Open it's Wings

18.  定步運手   Revolve Hands with Fixed Step

19.  左右打虎   Hit Tiger Left & Right

20.  野馬分鬃   Part Wild Horse's Mane

21.  玉女穿梭   Fair Lady Weaves at Shuttle

22.  金雞獨立   Golden Roaster Stands on One Leg

23.  拉弓射虎   Bend Bow & Shoot Tiger

24.  身前劃圓   Draw Circle in Front of Body

25.  立地托天   Stand on Earth & Lift Sky

26.  胸前平推   Push Evenly in front of Chest

27.  展臂擴胸   Extend Arms & Open Chest

28.  提頂收臀   Lift Head & Tighten Buttock

29. 十字沖捶   Stretching Cross Fist

30.  氣達四梢   Move Qi to Four Limbs

31.  頓開天目   Open Tian Mu Meridian

32.  心神合一   Unite Mind & Spirit

33.  意守丹田   Focus Yi on Dan Tian

(Translated by the Dong School Qigong group)

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       楊式太極劍套名目

       Yang Style Taiji Sword Posture Names

 

1.           三環套月   Three rings around the moon

2.           奎星   Quasar Style

3.           燕子抄水  Swallow skimming the water

4.           左右攔掃   Left right counter brushing

5.           小奎星   Small quasar

6.           燕子歸巢   Sparrow returning the nest

7.           靈貓捕鼠   Wise cat catching the mouse

8.           鳳凰抬頭   Phoenix raising its head

9.           黃蜂入洞   Yellow bee entering a hole

10.      鳳凰右展翅   Phoenix showing its right wing

11.      小奎星   Small quasar

12.      鳳凰左展翅   Phoenix showing its left wing

13.      等魚式   Waiting for the fish

14.      左右龍行   Dragon walking left and right

15.      宿鳥投林   Sleep bird returning to forest

16.      烏龍擺尾   Black dragon swinging its tail

17.      青龍出海    Green dragon emerging from sea

18.      風捲荷葉   Wind sweeping the lotus leaves

19.      左右獅子搖頭   Lion shaking its head left and right

20.      虎抱頭   Tiger embracing his head

21.      野馬跳澗   Wild horse jumping over creek

22.      懸崖勒馬   Arresting the horse

23.      指南針    Compass style

24.      左右迎風掸塵   Left right dusting against wind

25.      順水推舟   Pushing boat along the current

26.      流星趕月   Comet chasing the moon

27.      天馬行空   Heavenly horse walking in the sky

28.      挑簾式   Flipping the curtain

29.      左右車輪   Left right spinning wheel

30.      燕子啣泥   Swallow carrying dirt

31.      大鵬展翅   Big “Peng”bird showing its wing

32.      海底撈月   Scooping moon under seawater

33.      懷中抱月   Embracing the moon

34.      哪吒探海   “Narjar”venture into ocean

35.      犀牛望月   Rhinoceros looking at the moon

36.      射雁式   Shooting the wild geese

37.      青龍探爪   Green dragon showing its claws

38.      鳳凰雙展翅   Phoenix showing both wings

39.      左右跨攔   Left right counter-straddle

40.      射雁式   Shooting the wild geese

41.      白猿獻果   White ape offering fruits

42.      左右落花    Flowers falling left and right

43.      玉女穿梭   Fair lady weaving shuttle

44.      白虎攪尾   White tiger flipping its tail

45.      鯉魚躍龍門   Fish jumping over dragon-gate

46.      左右烏龍絞柱   Black dragon curling on pillar left and right

47.      仙人指路   Fairy showing direction

48.      朝天一柱香   One incense pointing skyward

49.      風掃梅花    Wind sweeping plum flowers

50.       牙笏式   Elephant's tusk

51.      合太極   Closing Taiji

 

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       董式短拳拳套名目

       Dong Style Short Form ( Ying Jie Fast Set ) Posture Names


1.       預備式    Preparatory Position

2.       太極起式   Beginning Movement

3.       攬切衣    Grab and Tie the Gown (Fast)

4.       單鞭      Single Whip (Fast)

5.       合勁        Closing Energy (Slow)

6.       仙鶴張翅     Fairy Crane Spreads its Wings ( Short Pause)

7.       托琵琶     Holding the Lute (Slow)

8.       轉 琵琶     Turning the Lute (Slow)

9.       裂掌       Splitting Palm (Fast)

10.     挫裂掌    Forward Splitting Palm ( Slow)

11.     跳步搬攬捶    Jump, Block, Parry and Punch down (Fast)

12.     連環圓封閉    Circle and Seal Continuously (Fast)

13.     豹虎回山洞  Leopard and Tiger Return to the Caves (Fast)

14.     挫掌簸箕式   Winnowing Movement with Splitting Palm (Slow)

15.     進退閃戰      Dodging Forward and Backward (Slow Circle)

16.     大鵬騰空     Big Bird Soars in the Air ( Soar )

17.     撞肋捶        Punch Ribs with Fist (Slow)

18.     白猿閃身    White Ape Dodges Away (Slowly Step Back)

19.     鳳凰斜展翅    Phoenix Spreads its Wings Slantingly (Short Pause)

20.      搬 攬捶         Block, Parry and Punch (Fast)

21.      返身搬攬捶  Turn Back, Block, Parry and Punch (Short Pause)

22.      進步攬挫衣    Step Forward, Grab and Tie the Gown (Fast)

23.      連環式      Continual Movement (Fast)

24.      刁手     Circling Hand up (Fast)

25.      左閃右避   Dodge to the Left, Evade to the Right (Slow Sweeps)

26.      探馬式      Pat on Horse (Slow)

27.      英雄獨立     Hero Stands on One Leg (Fast)

28.      騰身法      Jump backward (Fast)

29.      撩掌        Raise Hand and Block (Slow)

30.      鳳還巢     Phoenix Returns to Nest (Fast)

31.      太極還元    Ending Movement

 

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Evaluation Guidelines
for Janet Jin's Students

Like everything else, to master Tai Chi you need a good teacher to guide you, you also need to study and practice diligently. Whether you are doing it for health, for healing, for Martial Arts or for all, the most important thing is you need to be healthy to enjoy life and Tai Chi. I would also encourage you to use Tai Chi practice as a way of self-discovery and self-cultivation. There are many benefits that Tai Chi can offer you. Practice is the key to advancement. The more Gong Fu 功夫( time and effort ) you put in to Tai Chi, the more benefits such as health, strength & happiness, you will receive. The following guidelines will help you to understand where you are at and what you need to focus on for your practice.

Beginning Level
At this Level, your focus is on learning and familiarizing with the form, as well as working on basic Tai Chi stances, stepping and body coordination. There are three levels at this stage.

Level One:
Learn 1st section of Long Form and be able to do it on your own. You will be introduced to some Ji Ben gong 基本功( foundation drills ) to help you build a good foundation.

Level Two:
Learn and remember the 1st and 2nd sections of Long Form, to demonstrate proper horse stance, bow and arrow stance, weight-shifting and stepping.

Level Three:
Learn and remember the three sections of Long Form. Focus on good postures, proper alignment, smooth transition and even speed in any practice time duration.

Intermediate Level
At this level, you already build good body memory and know the Long Form by heart. You can start to focus on some basic principles that have to do with body coordination, expansion and integration. You are still working on the physical development at this level.

Level One:
You need to work on the following three principals to help you develop good posture and body coordination.

  1. Tou Rong Zheng Zhi 頭容正直
    Head and face stay upright, centered and in alignment with your body.
  2. Song Jian Zhui Zhou 鬆肩墜肘
    Relax shoulders and drop elbows naturally.
  3. Ti Ding Diao Dang 提頂吊檔
    Head up, feels light, as if it is lifted by a string. Tailbone and groin area has a sinking, expanding feeling.

Level Two:
You need to work on the following principals based on the Level One principals to perfect your form, body coordination, expansion and integration.

  1. Bu Pian Bu Yi , Wu Guo Bu Ji 不偏不倚, 無過不及
    No leaning and tilting, stay centered, donít over extend or under extend, keep it balanced and just right.
  2. Song Yao, Song Kua, Yuan Dang, Qu Xi 鬆腰, 鬆胯,圓檔,曲膝
    Relax/loosen/expand waist and hips area, crotch area keep rounded and bend knees (in alignment with your toes). This is a hard principle to work on. As I mentioned in class, many long-term practitioners got stuck at this level and preventing them to move forward. To achieve this principle, you need to do all the Ji Ben Gong ( foundation drills ) diligently to build a solid foundation.
  3. Advanced Level
    Congratulations! You have achieved something very special in your life and entered the internal world of Tai Chi. The following ten points are Yang Cheg Fuís guidelines to help you to achieve to a higher level of Tai Chi. Except points 3 and 5, the rest of 8 points are new to this level and will help you develop strong Nei Jin 內勁 (internal energy), more Qi 氣(vital energy) and Shen 神 (high spirit) . Once you master all the principles, you are not restricted to any forms or styles and you are ready to be on your own.

    YANG Cheng Fuís TEN IMPORTANT POINTS - by Yang Cheng-fu (1883 - 1936)
    1.Xu Ling Ding Jing 虛靈頂頸 The head should be upright, empty mind and uplift the spirit
    Do not use force, or the neck will be stiff, and the breath and blood can not flow through. It is necessary to have a natural and lively feeling. If the natural and lively feeling cannot reach the top of head, the spirit cannot rise.

    2. Han Xiong Ba Bei 涵胸拔背 Relax your chest and feel the energy expand and stretched your back
    The chest is contained naturally so that Qi Chen Dan Tian 氣沈丹田 (the Qi can sink to the Dantian). Do not stick out the chest. The qi gets stuck there and the body becomes top heavy, the heel tend to float and can be uprooted. Round the back and let the qi stick to it. When the chest is contained and the back is stretched, then you can issue jin (strength) through the spine.

    3. Song Yao 鬆腰 Relax/Loosen the waist section.
    The waist is the governor of the whole body. If you can relax the waist section, then the legs and the foundation will be firm and strong. The shifting between empty and solid steps is based on the turning of the waist. It is said that the source of the control lies in the waist. If you cannot gain power, seek the defect in the legs and waist section.

    4. Fen Xu Shi 分虛實 Differentiate insubstantial (empty) and substantial (solid).
    The first rule of all in Tai Chi Quan (tai chi boxing) is to differentiate Xu and Shi. If the weight of the whole body is resting on the right leg, then the right leg is substantial and the left leg is insubstantial, and vice versa. When you can separate substantial and insubstantial, you can turn lightly without using force. You need to able to differentiate Xu and Shi before you can turn and move easily. Otherwise the step is heavy and slow. The stance is not firm and can be easily thrown off balance.

    5. Song Jian Zhui Zhou 鬆肩墜肘 Relax the shoulders and drop the elbows.
    The shoulders are relaxed and loose. If you cannot relax and sink, the two shoulders will be tight, the qi will not flow and the whole body cannot produce jin (strength). "Drop the elbows" means the elbows relax naturally. If the elbows are suspending, the shoulders are not able to sink, relax, and you cannot issue your jin far. The discharge is close to the brute force of the external martial art.

    6. Yong Yi Bu Young Li 用意不用力 Use the intent and not force.
    The Tai Chi Quan classics say, "all of this means use of Yi (intent) and not of force." In practicing Tai Chi Quan, the whole body relaxes. Do not let any force remain in the blood vessels, bones, and ligaments to tie you up. Then you can be agile and able to change quickly. You will be able to turn freely and easily. Doubting this, how can you advance yourself? The body has meridians like the ground has ditches and trenches. If not obstructed, the water can flow. If meridian is not closed, the Qi goes through. If the whole body has brute force and it fills up the meridians, the Qi and blood stop and the turning is not smooth and agile. Just try to pull one string of hair to make the whole body lose balance. If you use intent, not force, then the intent goes to a place and the Qi follows it. The Qi and the blood circulate. If you do this every day and never stop, after a long time you will develop internal jin. The Tai Chi Quan classics say that when you are extremely soft, then you become extremely skilled in Tai Chi Quan with arms like iron wrapped with cotton and the weight is very heavy. As for those who practice the external martial arts, when they use force, they reveal force. When they do not use force, they are too light and floating. Their force is external and locked together. The force of the external martial arts is easily led and moved.

    7. Shang Xia Xiang Sui 上下相隨 Upper and lower body follow each other.
    The Tai Chi Quan classics say that the motion should be rooted in the feet, released through the legs, controlled by the waist and manifested through the fingers. Every posture applies to the same principal. When the hands, waist and feet move together, the eyes follow. If one part does not coordinate, the whole body is off balance, and the Qi will become dispersed.

    8. Nei Wai Xiang He 內外相合 Internal and external coordinate.
    In the practice of Tai Chi Quan the main thing is the spirit. Therefore, it is said that the spirit is the commander and the body is subordinate. If you can lift the spirit, then the movements will be naturally agile. The postures are not beyond insubstantial and substantial, open and close. Open means not only the arms and legs are open, but the mind and heart are also open. Close means not only arms and legs are closed, but also the mind and heart are focused within. When you can make the external and internal work together, then the jin becomes complete.

    9. Xiang Lian Bu Duan 相連不斷 The Jin is connected and not broken.
    As to the external martial arts, their force is the post-heaven brute force. Therefore, it is limited. There are connects and disconnects. During the disconnection the previous force is exhausted and the new force has not yet been born. At these moments, it is very easy for others to take advantage. The Tai Chi Quan uses intent and not force. From beginning to end it is continuous and not broken. It is circular and again resumes. It revolves and has no limits. The original classic says it is like a long river rolling on unceasing, and the circulation of internal energy is like pulling the silk thread. They all mean connect the energy together.

    10. Dong Zhong Qiu Jing 動中求靜 Seek stillness in movement.?
    The external martial arts assume jumping about is good and they use all the energy. That is why after practice everyone pants and gets tired. Tai Chi Quan uses stillness to govern movement. Although one moves, there is also stillness. Therefore, in practicing the form, slower is better. When you go slowly, the inhalation and exhalation are long and deep and the qi sinks to Dantian, naturally there is no injury such as engorgement or expanding of the blood vessels. The practitioner should be carefully study and comprehend it. Then one will get the true and accurate meaning of Tai Chi Quan.

    Enjoy life and enjoy Tai Chi!

    **Do Not Copy. This Guideline is for Janet Jin Tai Chi Classes Only.

    (April 16, 2014)